Function. Balance. Flexibility. – What Business Can Learn From Stanford Football in 2014

Although we Stanford alums had a bit of a setback in the Rose Bowl this year, we still have a football team of which we can be very proud. Part of what I believe makes this team so appealing to Stanford alums is not only that it wins, but also that it wins with an interesting mix of power and intellect. Part of what has made Stanford so successful in recent years is the ability to harness both of these traits in its unique approach to strength and fitness training, as described in The New York Times.

This is a fascinating article in which Shannon Turley, Stanford’s Kissick Family Director of Football Sports Performance, shares his perspective on the kind of training that builds high-performing college football and NFL players. Surprisingly, Turley points to factors such as ankle mobility as a key to success on the field, instead of traditional measures like bench press or 40 yard dash times. And given the very low rate of serious injury on a team that is known as one of the most physical in college football, it would seem like he is on the right track. 

There are a lot of parallels between what Stanford is looking for in its football players and what CEOs are looking for in their employees. In the most recent IBM Global CEO Study, CEOs identified flexibility as one of the core traits that they seek in new employees. As noted in the report, “CEOs are increasingly focused on finding employees with the ability to constantly reinvent themselves. These employees are comfortable with change; they learn as they go, often from others’ experiences.” Although I’ve also heard CEOs and other senior leaders use words such as agile and resilient to describe what they are looking for, I think they are all describing the same thing. They want people who can be successful in any circumstance, and who are able to change direction quickly as the world changes around them.

As more companies look for these kind of employees and skill sets to secure their future, they would be remiss if they did not have a Shannon Turley of their own on staff. While it is easy to agree that having a flexible, resilient workforce is a benefit for an organization, actually building one can be difficult. And, just like a winning football team, a winning organization requires someone who is solely focused on building its “players” to achieve their very best.

Who do you know that is doing a great job at this? Or has made a commitment to do so in 2014?

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s